Chloe Sariego

Chloe Sariego's picture
Education: 
B.A. Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College 2017
MPhil Sociology (with distinction), University of Cambridge 2019
Areas of Interest: 
Medical Sociology; Gender & Sexuality Studies; Comparative Historical Sociology; Migration; Reproduction, Fertility, and Genetic Technologies; Queer and Feminist Theory; Race and Ethnicity
Email: 
Chloe.sariego@yale.edu

Chloe Sariego is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and a certificate student in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Yale. She received her Bachelor’s degree at Sarah Lawrence College in 2017 and her Master’s degree with distinction at the University of Cambridge in 2019. At Cambridge, Chloe conducted research under the advisement of Sarah Franklin in the Reproductive Sociology Research Group (ReproSoc) and ran the department’s Queer Theory Reading Group.

Chloe’s research seeks to understand manifestations of state-power and control by placing reproduction at the center of questions about immigration and nationalism. Her master’s research used historical analysis and referential statistics to track overlapping developments in reproduction and immigration from the 1980s to the present in the United States. This research drew upon a variety of contexts in which reproduction figures centrally in contemporary nationalisms, especially problematizing the idea of “choice” and examining white supremacy’s historic use of birth control. Her thesis culminated on an analysis [HT1] of the detainment of a pregnant teenager in Garza v. Hargan (2018) and the history of forced sterilization in Madrigal v. Quilligan (1978).

At Yale, Chloe is continuing her research on reproduction with a focus on rising immigration-based inequalities emerging from international fertility markets and reproductive technologies. Chloe is currently researching the intersections of reproductive politics and fertility markets at the point of immigration between the United States and Mexico. In this context, she is examining how fertility clinics facilitate egg-donation and surrogacy practices that reproduce a racialized hierarchy between the two countries.

In her free time, Chloe likes to discuss heterodox economics and read feminist science fiction literature. You can keep up with her on twitter @chloesariego